WRITTEN ON April 20th, 2009 BY Meredith AND STORED IN Beef, Dinner, Italian, Pasta, Pork

Sunday at my house (read: little apartment) is a slow food day. I think about what to make for Sunday supper a few days ahead of time. It’s my favorite day of the week, the ultimate lazy day, and capping it off with a delicious, home-cooked meal seems the perfect tribute to the end of the weekend (I try not to think about the actual start of the week until Monday when the alarm goes off). In the summer, we usually grill, but for the other three seasons of year, Sunday is Italian night. Lots of fresh pasta and slow cooked sauces. The gnocci below got paired last night with “Sunday Sauce,” a long simmered mixture of ground beef, pork and veal in a tomato base. Call it meat and potatoes, Italian style. Check back later in the week for the Sunday Sauce recipe. It’s Soprano-licious! You’ll feel like Tony and Carmella, pre-sushi obsession.

Okey Gnocci!

Okey Gnocci!

Potato Gnocci (makes about 6 appetizer portions or 3-4 small entrée portions)
2 lbs baking potatoes
1 1/3 c. all purpose flour
1 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 400. With a fork, prick potatoes all over. Bake in oven for 1 hour until soft. Once potatoes are out of oven, put a large pot of well salted water on to boil. While potatoes are still warm, scoop them out of their skins into a potato ricer or food mill. Push them through the ricer into a medium sized bowl. Add flour, salt and nutmeg and stir to combine (this should take no more than about 30 seconds. You don’t want to over mix the flour and activate the glutens. See earlier post!). Once everything is incorporated, turn out onto well floured surface and form into a ball. Cut off a small piece, and roll into a cylindrical rope about ¾ inch thick. Cut in to 1 inch long pieces. Using the end of a fork, roll each lightly off of the tines to create ridges on each gnocco (see picture below). Once the water is boiling, test the gnocci made. Drop into boiling water, once they float to the surface, give them about 10 seconds longer, remove to a large bowl with a slotted spoon. Taste! They should be cooked through and not slimy. If they are slimy or overly gooey once cooked, or fall apart when you drop them in the water, add a couple more tablespoons of flour to the dough and work to incorporate. Just remember to test a new piece each time you have added flour (if you need to add). Once you are happy with your tester and your dough, repeat the forming process (roll into ropes, cut inch long pieces, roll off fork). As you form them, lay them out in a single layer on a kitchen towel. Cook in batches of 15-20. You don’t want to overcrowd your pot. As each batch finishes, remove from water with slotted spoon, place into serving bowl and dress with a small amount of whatever sauce you’ll be using. Once all gnocci are cooked, toss with sauce, cheese, fresh herbs, and serve immediately.

Roll, baby, roll

Roll, baby, roll

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